Second Season: Graduate Dance Concert
Apr
13
to Apr 15

Second Season: Graduate Dance Concert

Featuring provocative choreography by MFA in Dance students, this concert is a collection of eclectic new works, serving as an unguarded exploration of these diverse artists' talents and interests.

Natalie Groom, Heidi McFall, and Grace Tietz will be performing Optical Chicken.

There are three shows:
Friday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 14 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday April 15 at 3 p.m.

Free, tickets required.
http://theclarice.umd.edu/events/2018/second-season

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Wavelength Winds Spring Recital
Apr
5
8:00 PM20:00

Wavelength Winds Spring Recital

Wavelength Winds performs its Spring recital at 8 pm in Gildenhorn Recital hall at The Clarice. Join us for this free event!

We will be performing:
August Klughardt: Quintett, op. 79
Fazil Say: Woodwind Quintet, op.35 "Alevi Dedeler Rakı Masasında"
Theodor Blumer: Schweizer Quintett

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DMA Chamber Recital with Zsolt Balogh
Mar
28
8:00 PM20:00

DMA Chamber Recital with Zsolt Balogh

Join me for my second doctoral recital in Gildenhorn Recital Hall at the University of Maryland! This recital is free and open to the public. 

Performers:
Natalie Groom, clarinet
Zsolt Balogh, piano
Anto Meliksetian
Becca Barnet, viola
Derek Maseoff, horn

Program:
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Trio in Eb Major, K. 498, “Kegelstatt” 
I. Andante
II. Menuetto
III. Allegretto

Franz Schubert
Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, D.965, "The Shepherd on the Rock"

Ernö Dohnányi
Sextet, op. 37
I.    Allegro appassionata
II.    Intermezzo. Adagio
III.    Allegro con sentiment
IV.    Finale. Allegro vivace, giocoso
 

 

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Optical Chicken: a Music and Dance Collaboration
Nov
29
8:00 PM20:00

Optical Chicken: a Music and Dance Collaboration

Join choreographer and dancer Heidi McFall, dancer Grace Tietz, and clarinetist Natalie Groom for an exploratory music and dance collaboration.

Optical Chicken explores the absurdity of social interactions, the intimacy of private moments, and the spectrum of strangeness in between. Like chickens, we are engaged in “games” dictated by arbitrary social constructs. Our well-being depends on our ability to play the game. In this piece, the performers test the limits of social gaming, highlighting their own strangeness and peculiarities.

“Optical” alludes to gaze behavior—how the act of looking changes both the viewer and the object being viewed in a powerful way. This is referenced in the opening readings from Optical Distortion, Inc., a Harvard Business School case study about contact lenses for chickens. Along with musical references to the Chicken Dance, it is a happy coincidence (or is it?) that these disjunct elements demonstrate the absurdity of the social.

This show takes places at the Electric Maid in Takoma, D.C. at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, November 29. Stop by to meet our artists and participate in the experience!

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Wavelength Winds at The Kennedy Center
Nov
26
6:00 PM18:00

Wavelength Winds at The Kennedy Center

  • The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us as we end our Thanksgiving Holiday in a shared concert with the Omer Quartet on Millennium Stage.

Omer Quartet’s violinists Mason Yu and Erica Tursi, violist Jinsun Hong, and cellist Alex Cox are leaders among today’s young string quartets. Top prizewinners of the XI Premio Paolo Borciani Competition in Italy, Bordeaux International Competition in France, and the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition, the quartet has been praised for playing with a “sense of discovery and adventure, but also with considerable finesse.” Fresh out of Boston having just completed a graduate residency at the New England Conservatory, they are currently the Doctoral Fellowship String Quartet in residence at the University of Maryland. 

Wavelength Winds is the fourth graduate fellowship wind quintet in residence at the University of Maryland. In addition to conservatory training, Wavelength’s members offer unique cross-disciplinary backgrounds ranging from business to international politics. Wavelength seeks to present diverse, challenging repertoire and cutting-edge collaborations, embracing music lovers of all kinds.
Presented in collaboration with the University of Maryland.

Find our event on the Kennedy Center's website here: https://www.kennedy-center.org/Video/Performance/64176

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Wavelength Winds Debut Recital
Nov
15
5:00 PM17:00

Wavelength Winds Debut Recital

  • 8705 Alumni Drive College Park, MD, 20740 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Wavelength Winds will be presenting its first full recital on Wednesday, November 15th at 5pm in Gildenhorn Recital Hall at the Clarice Performing Arts Center of the University of Maryland, College Park. This concert is free and open to the public.

The program includes:
Paquito D'Rivera: Aires Tropicales
Jean Francaix: Quintet No. 1
Pavel Haas: Wind Quintet, op. 10
Jean-Philippe Rameau: Gavotte and Six Doubles

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First Year DMA Recital
Nov
10
5:00 PM17:00

First Year DMA Recital

  • Ulrich Recital Hall, Tawes Fine Arts Building (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

My first DMA recital at the University of Maryland will feature pianist Zsolt Balogh and the following works:

Kenji Bunch: Cookbook
Norbert Burgmuller: Duo, Op. 18
Eric Mandat: Tricolor Capers
Antoni Szalowski: Sonatina

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Oct
25
7:00 PM19:00

If Music Be the Food Benefit Concert

  • 811 Cathedral Street Baltimore, MD, 21201 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

World-class musicians from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Peabody Conservatory, and University of Maryland come together for this concert to increase awareness and support for the hungry.

Advance tickets are available up till three days before the concert and are $12 for general admission and $7 for students. Otherwise, tickets are $15 for general admission and $10 for students. All proceeds from the series benefit the Maryland Food Bank. Audience members are also invited to bring non-perishable food items for donation. If you would like to make an additional donation, please visit https://www.mdfoodbank.org/music.

Program:

Le Api by Antonino Pasculli (1842-1924)

Lydia Consilvio, oboe
Lior Willinger, piano

Wind Quintet, Op. 10 by Pavel Haas (1899-1944)
I. Preludio
II. Preghiera
III. Ballo Eccentrico
IV. Epilogo

Wind Quintet No. 1 by Jean Françaix (1912-1997)
I. Andante tranquillo – Allegro assai
II. Presto
III. Tema con variazoni. Andante
IV. Tempo di Marcia Francese

University of Maryland Fellowship Woodwind Quintet: 
Naomi Harrow, flute
Lydia Consilvio, oboe
Natalie Groom, clarinet
Derek Maseloff, horn
Qun (Jimmy) Ren, bassoon

Intermission

Piano Quartet in E flat major, K. 493 by W.A. Mozart (1756-1791)
I. Allegro
II. Larghetto
III. Allegretto

Holly Jenkins, violin
Jacob Shack, viola
Tzu-Jou Yeh, cello
Lior Willinger, piano

Parking:
Parking is available in the PMI lot directly behind the church (enter the lot off Charles or Read Streets). The fees for this lot vary depending on day and time. Street parking, both metered and unmetered, is often available throughout the neighborhood.

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Oct
21
8:00 PM20:00

Wind Orchestra Chamber Concert

  • 8705 Alumni Drive College Park, MD, 20740 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Natalie, members of Wavelength Winds, and the UMD Wind Orchestra for a night of special chamber music!

Mozart’s masterful “Gran Partita” was described by his contemporaries as being of a “rare and special type.” In this concert, it is combined with chamber music by Steve Reich, Jean Sibelius and Giovanni Gabrieli.

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Oct
6
8:00 PM20:00

Remembrances and Tributes Wind Orchestra Concert

  • 8270 Alumni Drive College Park, MD, 20742 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Natalie Groom, members of Wavelength Winds, and the UMD Wind Orchestra for works by Kernis, Lindberg, Mozart, and Adam Schoenberg.

Kernis’ short fanfare For Love of the Mountains evokes the grandeur of the Grand Tetons, while Lindberg’s Souvenir reflects the composer’s thoughts on his influential teachers. Adam Schoenberg’s American Symphony was inspired by Barack Obama’s 2008 election. Together, these works explore the ways in which composers have been inspired by people and events.

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Henri SELMER Paris Clarinet Academy
May
31
to Jun 4

Henri SELMER Paris Clarinet Academy

  • Michigan State University, Cook Hall, School of Music (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Ms. Groom attends the 2017 Henri Selmer Summer Clarinet Academy as a Selmer-sponsored scholarship recipient. The Academy offers an immersive experience at one of the top premiere summer educational seminars to young and talented clarinetists. The featured artists include: Guy Yehuda (artistic director), Stephen Williamson, Michael Rusinek, Tasha Warren, James Campbell, and Robert Spring.  

Masterclasses are open to the public. Ms. Groom performs at 11 a.m on Sunday, June 4 in a masterclass with Philippe Berrod, professor of the Paris Conservatoire and principal of Orchestre de Paris, and at the Academy's closing recital at 4:30 p.m. All performances and masterclasses will take place in Cook Hall at the Michigan State University School of Music.


https://henriselmeracademy.com/

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Arizona Symphony Orchestra plays Dvorak Symphony No. 6
Apr
28
7:30 PM19:30

Arizona Symphony Orchestra plays Dvorak Symphony No. 6

  • Crowder Hall, Fred Fox School of Music (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Natalie Groom will perform as principal clarinet of the Arizona Symphony Orchestra in a shared concert on Friday, April 28, 2017 at 7:30 p.m., in Crowder Hall. The University of Arizona orchestras are under the direction of Dr. Thomas Cockrell, director of orchestral activities at the Fred Fox School of Music. 

The UA Philharmonic Orchestra will perform the first half of the program, opening with Sergei Prokofiev's "Lieutenant Kijé Suite," under the baton of doctoral student András Derecskei. 
Doctoral student Juan Montoya then takes the podium to perform "The Firebird Suite" by Igor Stravinsky.

After a brief intermission, the Arizona Symphony Orchestra will perform the Antonín Dvořák's Symphony No. 6 in D Major conducted by Maestro Thomas Cockrell. 

Friday, April 28, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.
Crowder Hall
$10 general
$7 UA employees & seniors 55+
$5 students

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Tucson Masterworks Chorale at CUMC
Apr
23
3:00 PM15:00

Tucson Masterworks Chorale at CUMC

Tucson Masterworks Chorale, now in its 67th year of presenting the great masterworks of choral literature to Tucson audiences, announces its Spring concert program.

The Chorale will be presenting an evening of “German Romantics,” showcasing works by Johannes Brahms and Felix Mendelssohn with full orchestra under the direction of Jonathan Kim.

The concert begins with Brahm’s Schicksalslied, Op.54, also known as Song of Destiny, and concludes with Mendelssohn’s Psalm 42, Op.42.

Sunday April 23rd, 2017, 3:00 pm
Catalina United Methodist Church,
2700 E Speedway Blvd, Tucson

Ticket sales are available online or You may also purchase tickets from any Chorale member.

https://squareup.com/store/tucsonmasterworkschorale

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Tucson Masterworks Chorale- German Romantics
Apr
22
7:00 PM19:00

Tucson Masterworks Chorale- German Romantics

Tucson Masterworks Chorale, now in its 67th year of presenting the great masterworks of choral literature to Tucson audiences, announces its Spring concert program.

The Chorale will be presenting an evening of “German Romantics,” showcasing works by Johannes Brahms and Felix Mendelssohn with full orchestra under the direction of Jonathan Kim.

The concert begins with Brahm’s Schicksalslied, Op.54, also known as Song of Destiny, and concludes with Mendelssohn’s Psalm 42, Op.42.

Saturday April 22nd, 2017, 7:00 pm
St. Mark Catholic Church
2727 W. Tangerine Rd, Oro Valley

Ticket sales are available online or You may also purchase tickets from any Chorale member.

https://squareup.com/store/tucsonmasterworkschorale

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Dialogue of the Carmelites
Apr
9
3:00 PM15:00

Dialogue of the Carmelites

I will be performing as principal clarinetist with the Arizona Symphony Orchestra and the University of Arizona's opera studio. 

The University of Arizona Opera Theater presents "Dialogues of the Carmelites" by Francis Poulenc on Friday, April 7, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 9, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.

Francis Poulenc (1899-1963) based his dramatic opera on the story of the Martyrs of Compiègne, Carmelite nuns who were sent to the guillotine during the Reign of Terror in the final days of the French Revolution. In this provocative 20th century opera, the composer vividly depicts these prisoners of conscience, devoted to God and their monastic order, with rich harmonies, poignant lyrics and colorful orchestration. The opera will be presented in English with supertitles.

Mary Duncan is the guest stage director and Thomas Cockrell, music director, will conduct the Arizona Symphony Orchestra. Sets are designed by Sally Day and costumes are created by Christopher Allen.

Cast:
The Marquis de la Force: Antonio Cruz
Blanche: Abigail Hart (Friday) & Ariana Iñiguez (Sunday)
The Chevalier de la Force: Kyle DeGraff
Madame de Croissy, The Prioress: Piper Pack-Smith
Madame Lidoine, the new Prioress: Clara Salomon (Friday) & Soleil Oliva (Sunday)
Mother Marie: Samantha Luna
Sister Constance: Samantha Hornback (Friday) & Michelle Perrier (Sunday)
Mother Jeanne: Athena Beebe
Sister Mathilde: Matthew Alexander
The Father Confessor:  Joseph Gouge
First Officer: Dan Marino
Second Officer: Simon Faddoul
Third Officer: Juan Flores
The Jailer: Mark Hockenberry
Thierry, a servant: David Ingram
M. Javelinot: Javier Molina

Mary Duncan, guest stage director

Mary Duncan’s direction has been described as “inventive” and “an exciting fusion of ensemble acting, fluid staging and established singing talent” by the New York Times and Opera News.
For the Kennedy Center Mozart Festival, she directed "The Impresario," "Bastien und Bastienne," and "La Clemenza di Tito" with the National Symphony Orchestra, Sir Christopher Hogwood - conductor. Other productions include Brooklyn Academy of Music "The Rape of Lucretia" and "Amahl and the Night Visitors," Berkshire Opera, (associate artistic director) where she directed numerous productions including the premiere of Stephen Paulus’ "Summer," "The Consul," (recorded by Newport Classic) "The Rake’s Progress," "The Turn of the Screw," "Susannah," and "La Cenerentola." Ms. Duncan directed American premieres of "La Jolie Fille de Perth," and "Maskarade" (in Danish) with Sarasota Opera. Her production of "The Magic Flute," with designs by Eric Carle aired on PBS New England. 

Over a long association with The Aspen Music Festival, Ms. Duncan has directed "The Marriage of Figaro," "The Seven Deadly Sins," Cole Porter: "Let's Misbehave," "Comedy on the Bridge," "Renard, and Noye's Fludde." In addition to Aspen, faculty positions include The Juilliard School, where she choreographed "Vanessa and The Mighty Casey," and as guest faculty at The Shepherd School of Music, Rice University where she also directed "Our Town." Ms. Duncan is a graduate of The Juilliard School and studied at Harvard’s A.R.T. where she interned with Robert Brustein.

Thomas Cockrell, music director and conductor

Dr. Thomas Cockrell has served as the Nelson Riddle Endowed Chair in Music, director of orchestral activities and music director of the UA Opera Theater at the University of Arizona since 2000. Cockrell is equally at home on the symphonic podium and in the opera pit, working with professionals or student musicians. In 2010 he was appointed artistic director of Opera in the Ozarks, which he had previously served as music director from 2003 to 2005.  He has conducted the professional symphony orchestras of Dallas, Cincinnati, Phoenix, Tucson, Louisville and Boulder, as well as several in Romania, Italy, Mexico and South Korea. Operatic credits include productions for Dayton Opera, Opera Colorado, Opera Theatre of the Rockies and Washington D.C.'s Summer Opera Theatre. He served as the associate conductor of Cincinnati Opera, Opera Colorado, The Colorado Symphony Orchestra and the Spoleto Festivals and music director of Denver Young Artists Orchestra. He was a member of the conducting faculty of the Interlochen Arts Camp from 2006 to 2008. Cockrell frequently is the conductor and clinician for regional and all state music festivals. In 2008 he was the conducting master teacher for the College Orchestra Directors Association national conference and is increasingly sought after for conducting master courses in the USA, Mexico, Asia and Europe.

Before coming to the University of Arizona, Cockrell was on the faculty of the University of California, Irvine and the State University of New York at Purchase. He has been a visiting professor at the National Academy of Music in Bucharest, Romania and a faculty artist at the Academie Internationale de Musique, Chateau de Rangiport.

Cockrell earned his Doctor of Musical Arts and Master of Music degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and a Bachelor of Arts from Yale University. He studied conducting with Franco Ferrara in Rome and at Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, Italy. Additionally, he was an Aspen Conducting Fellow and completed advanced training at the Conservatoire Americain in Fontainebleau, France and the Tanglewood Music Center, where he worked with Gustav Meier, Leonard Bernstein and Seiji Ozawa.

Synopsis
(From the Metropolitan Opera, metopera.org)

Paris, April 1789 to July 1794

Act I
The first signs of the French Revolution are beginning to shake the country. The Marquis de la Force and his son, the Chevalier, are worried about Blanche, the Chevalier’s fearful, nervous sister, whose carriage has been held up by a mob on her way home. When Blanche arrives she makes light of the incident, but her anxiety is revealed when a servant’s shadow frightens her as she leaves the room. Shaken, she returns to tell her father that she has made up her mind to become a nun.

Weeks later at the Carmelite convent in Compiègne, Blanche is interviewed by Madame de Croissy, the aged and ailing prioress, who makes it clear to Blanche that the convent is a house of prayer, not a refuge. The prioress is touched by Blanche’s resolve to embrace her new life.

Blanche and young Sister Constance discuss their fear of death, which Constance claims to have overcome. Blanche admits her envy of her companion’s straightforward and easygoing nature. Constance shocks Blanche by telling her that she knows they will both die young and on the same day.

Madame de Croissy is lying on her deathbed, struggling to appear calm. She blesses Blanche and consigns her, as the youngest member of the order, to the care of the loyal mother Marie. The prioress confesses her fear in the hour of death, then falls lifeless.

Act II
That night in the chapel, Constance and Blanche keep vigil by the prioress’s bier. Blanche is overcome by fear and about to run off, when mother Marie appears. Realizing that Blanche is genuinely afraid she tries to calm her.

Constance hopes that mother Marie will be the new prioress. She tells Blanche that she wonders why a god-fearing person like Madame de Croissy had to die such an agonizing death. Perhaps, she says, people don’t die for themselves but for others. Someone else will be surprised one day to find death easy.

Madame Lidoine has been appointed the new prioress. In the chapter room, she addresses the convent, counseling patience and humility. A visitor is announced—it is the Chevalier, Blanche’s brother, who is about to flee the country. He urges Blanche to leave the convent and return to their father. Blanche replies that her duty is to her sisters.
In the sacristy, the chaplain, forbidden to perform his duties, celebrates his last mass. The nuns discuss the fear that has grabbed the country and mother Marie wonders if self-sacrifice will be their destiny. Madame Lidoine reminds them that martyrs are not chosen by their own will, only by God’s. Knocking is heard and the sounds of an angry crowd. Two Commissioners enter and tell the sisters that they have been expelled from the convent. One of them, speaking quietly to mother Marie, adds he will do what he can to help them get away safely. One of the sisters gives Blanche a figurine of the Christ Child. When revolutionary cries are heard from outside, Blanche nervously drops the figure, breaking it. She is horrified by this omen.

Act III
In the devastated chapel, mother Marie suggests in Madame Lidoine’s absence that they all take a vow of martyrdom by unanimous decision. Noting Blanche’s reaction, the others suspect she will vote against it. When the secret ballot reveals one dissenter, Constance claims it was she and asks to reverse her vote so the vow can proceed. Blanche, afraid to live or to die, runs away. The sisters are led from the convent.

Blanche is forced to work as a servant in the ransacked mansion of her father, who has been sent to the guillotine. mother Marie finds her there to take her back to the sisters. On the streets, Blanche learns that the nuns have been arrested.

At the Conciergerie prison, Madame Lidoine joins the sisters in their vow of martyrdom. Constance says that she has dreamed of Blanche’s return. A jailer enters and reads the death sentence. Madame Lidoine blesses the sisters. When mother Marie learns from the chaplain that the nuns will die, she resolves to join them, but the chaplain reminds her that it is for God to decide whether or not she will be a martyr.

A crowd has gathered on the Place de la Révolution. The Carmelites walk towards the guillotine, led by Madame Lidoine and singing the Salve Regina. With each stroke of the blade, their voices are cut off one by one, finally leaving only Constance. On her way to the scaffold, she sees Blanche step up from the crowd, take up the chant, and follow her to her death.

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Dialogue of the Carmelites
Apr
7
7:30 PM19:30

Dialogue of the Carmelites

I will be performing as principal clarinetist with the Arizona Symphony Orchestra and the University of Arizona's opera studio. 

The University of Arizona Opera Theater presents "Dialogues of the Carmelites" by Francis Poulenc on Friday, April 7, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 9, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.

Francis Poulenc (1899-1963) based his dramatic opera on the story of the Martyrs of Compiègne, Carmelite nuns who were sent to the guillotine during the Reign of Terror in the final days of the French Revolution. In this provocative 20th century opera, the composer vividly depicts these prisoners of conscience, devoted to God and their monastic order, with rich harmonies, poignant lyrics and colorful orchestration. The opera will be presented in English with supertitles.

Mary Duncan is the guest stage director and Thomas Cockrell, music director, will conduct the Arizona Symphony Orchestra. Sets are designed by Sally Day and costumes are created by Christopher Allen.

Cast:
The Marquis de la Force: Antonio Cruz
Blanche: Abigail Hart (Friday) & Ariana Iñiguez (Sunday)
The Chevalier de la Force: Kyle DeGraff
Madame de Croissy, The Prioress: Piper Pack-Smith
Madame Lidoine, the new Prioress: Clara Salomon (Friday) & Soleil Oliva (Sunday)
Mother Marie: Samantha Luna
Sister Constance: Samantha Hornback (Friday) & Michelle Perrier (Sunday)
Mother Jeanne: Athena Beebe
Sister Mathilde: Matthew Alexander
The Father Confessor:  Joseph Gouge
First Officer: Dan Marino
Second Officer: Simon Faddoul
Third Officer: Juan Flores
The Jailer: Mark Hockenberry
Thierry, a servant: David Ingram
M. Javelinot: Javier Molina

Mary Duncan, guest stage director

Mary Duncan’s direction has been described as “inventive” and “an exciting fusion of ensemble acting, fluid staging and established singing talent” by the New York Times and Opera News.
For the Kennedy Center Mozart Festival, she directed "The Impresario," "Bastien und Bastienne," and "La Clemenza di Tito" with the National Symphony Orchestra, Sir Christopher Hogwood - conductor. Other productions include Brooklyn Academy of Music "The Rape of Lucretia" and "Amahl and the Night Visitors," Berkshire Opera, (associate artistic director) where she directed numerous productions including the premiere of Stephen Paulus’ "Summer," "The Consul," (recorded by Newport Classic) "The Rake’s Progress," "The Turn of the Screw," "Susannah," and "La Cenerentola." Ms. Duncan directed American premieres of "La Jolie Fille de Perth," and "Maskarade" (in Danish) with Sarasota Opera. Her production of "The Magic Flute," with designs by Eric Carle aired on PBS New England. 

Over a long association with The Aspen Music Festival, Ms. Duncan has directed "The Marriage of Figaro," "The Seven Deadly Sins," Cole Porter: "Let's Misbehave," "Comedy on the Bridge," "Renard, and Noye's Fludde." In addition to Aspen, faculty positions include The Juilliard School, where she choreographed "Vanessa and The Mighty Casey," and as guest faculty at The Shepherd School of Music, Rice University where she also directed "Our Town." Ms. Duncan is a graduate of The Juilliard School and studied at Harvard’s A.R.T. where she interned with Robert Brustein.

Thomas Cockrell, music director and conductor

Dr. Thomas Cockrell has served as the Nelson Riddle Endowed Chair in Music, director of orchestral activities and music director of the UA Opera Theater at the University of Arizona since 2000. Cockrell is equally at home on the symphonic podium and in the opera pit, working with professionals or student musicians. In 2010 he was appointed artistic director of Opera in the Ozarks, which he had previously served as music director from 2003 to 2005.  He has conducted the professional symphony orchestras of Dallas, Cincinnati, Phoenix, Tucson, Louisville and Boulder, as well as several in Romania, Italy, Mexico and South Korea. Operatic credits include productions for Dayton Opera, Opera Colorado, Opera Theatre of the Rockies and Washington D.C.'s Summer Opera Theatre. He served as the associate conductor of Cincinnati Opera, Opera Colorado, The Colorado Symphony Orchestra and the Spoleto Festivals and music director of Denver Young Artists Orchestra. He was a member of the conducting faculty of the Interlochen Arts Camp from 2006 to 2008. Cockrell frequently is the conductor and clinician for regional and all state music festivals. In 2008 he was the conducting master teacher for the College Orchestra Directors Association national conference and is increasingly sought after for conducting master courses in the USA, Mexico, Asia and Europe.

Before coming to the University of Arizona, Cockrell was on the faculty of the University of California, Irvine and the State University of New York at Purchase. He has been a visiting professor at the National Academy of Music in Bucharest, Romania and a faculty artist at the Academie Internationale de Musique, Chateau de Rangiport.

Cockrell earned his Doctor of Musical Arts and Master of Music degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and a Bachelor of Arts from Yale University. He studied conducting with Franco Ferrara in Rome and at Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, Italy. Additionally, he was an Aspen Conducting Fellow and completed advanced training at the Conservatoire Americain in Fontainebleau, France and the Tanglewood Music Center, where he worked with Gustav Meier, Leonard Bernstein and Seiji Ozawa.

Synopsis
(From the Metropolitan Opera, metopera.org)

Paris, April 1789 to July 1794

Act I
The first signs of the French Revolution are beginning to shake the country. The Marquis de la Force and his son, the Chevalier, are worried about Blanche, the Chevalier’s fearful, nervous sister, whose carriage has been held up by a mob on her way home. When Blanche arrives she makes light of the incident, but her anxiety is revealed when a servant’s shadow frightens her as she leaves the room. Shaken, she returns to tell her father that she has made up her mind to become a nun.

Weeks later at the Carmelite convent in Compiègne, Blanche is interviewed by Madame de Croissy, the aged and ailing prioress, who makes it clear to Blanche that the convent is a house of prayer, not a refuge. The prioress is touched by Blanche’s resolve to embrace her new life.

Blanche and young Sister Constance discuss their fear of death, which Constance claims to have overcome. Blanche admits her envy of her companion’s straightforward and easygoing nature. Constance shocks Blanche by telling her that she knows they will both die young and on the same day.

Madame de Croissy is lying on her deathbed, struggling to appear calm. She blesses Blanche and consigns her, as the youngest member of the order, to the care of the loyal mother Marie. The prioress confesses her fear in the hour of death, then falls lifeless.

Act II
That night in the chapel, Constance and Blanche keep vigil by the prioress’s bier. Blanche is overcome by fear and about to run off, when mother Marie appears. Realizing that Blanche is genuinely afraid she tries to calm her.

Constance hopes that mother Marie will be the new prioress. She tells Blanche that she wonders why a god-fearing person like Madame de Croissy had to die such an agonizing death. Perhaps, she says, people don’t die for themselves but for others. Someone else will be surprised one day to find death easy.

Madame Lidoine has been appointed the new prioress. In the chapter room, she addresses the convent, counseling patience and humility. A visitor is announced—it is the Chevalier, Blanche’s brother, who is about to flee the country. He urges Blanche to leave the convent and return to their father. Blanche replies that her duty is to her sisters.
In the sacristy, the chaplain, forbidden to perform his duties, celebrates his last mass. The nuns discuss the fear that has grabbed the country and mother Marie wonders if self-sacrifice will be their destiny. Madame Lidoine reminds them that martyrs are not chosen by their own will, only by God’s. Knocking is heard and the sounds of an angry crowd. Two Commissioners enter and tell the sisters that they have been expelled from the convent. One of them, speaking quietly to mother Marie, adds he will do what he can to help them get away safely. One of the sisters gives Blanche a figurine of the Christ Child. When revolutionary cries are heard from outside, Blanche nervously drops the figure, breaking it. She is horrified by this omen.

Act III
In the devastated chapel, mother Marie suggests in Madame Lidoine’s absence that they all take a vow of martyrdom by unanimous decision. Noting Blanche’s reaction, the others suspect she will vote against it. When the secret ballot reveals one dissenter, Constance claims it was she and asks to reverse her vote so the vow can proceed. Blanche, afraid to live or to die, runs away. The sisters are led from the convent.

Blanche is forced to work as a servant in the ransacked mansion of her father, who has been sent to the guillotine. mother Marie finds her there to take her back to the sisters. On the streets, Blanche learns that the nuns have been arrested.

At the Conciergerie prison, Madame Lidoine joins the sisters in their vow of martyrdom. Constance says that she has dreamed of Blanche’s return. A jailer enters and reads the death sentence. Madame Lidoine blesses the sisters. When mother Marie learns from the chaplain that the nuns will die, she resolves to join them, but the chaplain reminds her that it is for God to decide whether or not she will be a martyr.

A crowd has gathered on the Place de la Révolution. The Carmelites walk towards the guillotine, led by Madame Lidoine and singing the Salve Regina. With each stroke of the blade, their voices are cut off one by one, finally leaving only Constance. On her way to the scaffold, she sees Blanche step up from the crowd, take up the chant, and follow her to her death.

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Alzheimer's Association Benefit Concert and Trevor Barroero's Senior Recital
Mar
22
7:30 PM19:30

Alzheimer's Association Benefit Concert and Trevor Barroero's Senior Recital

"...in loving memory" is presented by Trevor Barroero in completion of his senior recital and as a memorial concert and benefit concert for the Alzheimer's Association.

On Wednesday, March 22, Ms. Groom will be performing with a chamber ensemble for this Alzheimer's Association benefit concert. Please join us!

You can donate at the event or online here:
http://act.alz.org/goto/trevorconcert

And you can watch the live stream here:
http://www.livestream.com/ffsom/events/7041357

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Studio Jazz Ensemble: A Night with Terell Stafford
Mar
10
7:30 PM19:30

Studio Jazz Ensemble: A Night with Terell Stafford

  • Crowder Hall, Fred Fox School of Music (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Natalie Groom will perform with the UA Studio Jazz Ensemble Friday, March 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Crowder Hall for the final concert of UA Jazz Week, A Night With Terell Stafford.

Tickets are $40, 35, 30, 20.
UApresents event Tickets: uapresents.org, 520-621-3341
or at Centennial Hall Box Office, 1020 E. University Blvd.

The University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music presents its 39th Annual AzJazz Week, featuring five concerts. Daily performances will take place starting Monday, March 6 through Friday, March 10, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in Crowder Hall. Please see full schedule of events listed at music.arizona.edu. The jazz studies area at the UA Fred Fox School of Music is under the direction of Dr. Angelo Versace.

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Arizona Symphony Orchestra: Berlioz, Saint-Saëns, and R. Strauss
Mar
4
7:30 PM19:30

Arizona Symphony Orchestra: Berlioz, Saint-Saëns, and R. Strauss

  • Crowder Hall, Fred Fox School of Music (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Natalie Groom will perform as Eb clarinetist with the Arizona Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, March 4, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in Crowder Hall.

You can catch the livestream here:
https://livestream.com/ffsom/events/7009797

Under the baton of Maestro Thomas Cockrell, members of the orchestra will perform "Roman Carnival Overture by Hector Berlioz and "Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks by Richard Strauss. Doctoral conducting major Juan Montoya will lead the orchestra in "Bacchanale" from "Samson and Delilah" by Camille Saint-Saëns.

This concert will also feature performances by the Fred Fox Graduate Wind Quintet, the University of Arizona Graduate String Quartet and the Fred Fox Graduate Brass Quintet.

Please join us for other upcoming performances of the Arizona Symphony Orchestra during the 2016-2017 academic year: April 6-9 (opera); and April 28.

Program:

Hector Berlioz (1803-1869)
Le carnaval romain, Op. 9
(Roman Carnival Overture)

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)
Bacchanale from "Samson et Dalila"
(Bacchanale from "Samson and Delilah")

Richard Strauss (1864-1949)
Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche
(Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks)

Also featuring performances by
Fred Fox Graduate Wind Quintet
The University of Arizona Graduate String Quartet

Fred Fox Graduate Brass Quintet

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Clif Weston's Chamber Winds Recital
Mar
1
7:30 PM19:30

Clif Weston's Chamber Winds Recital

  • Crowder Hall, Fred Fox School of Music (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join conductor Clif Weston and performers from the Fred Fox School of Music a chamber winds concert! This concert is March 1, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in Crowder Hall at the Fred Fox School of Music

Works include: Charles Simon Catel's Overture in C, Reynaldo Hahn's Le Bal de Béatrice d'Este, and Emile Bernard's Divertissement Op. 36.

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